Priming People for Success

When we believe we can do more and achieve more (or when others believe it for us), that is often the precise reason we do achieve more.

Shawn Achor, The Happiness Advantage

Sometimes we forget how important some of the signals we send are to the mood and success of the people we interact with. I was struck by a couple of examples that Shawn Achor provided in the The Happiness Advantage and how a renewed focus on the tone, body language, facial expressions and the little things we say along the way could be a factor in increasing positivity and success.

One example from Achor’s book described a study done at the Yale School of Management where students were put on teams to work together for an imaginary company. Each team had an actor who was their manager and they each spoke to their teams in a different tone. The tones used on the four teams were the following: cheerful enthusiasm, serene warmth, depressed sluggishness and hostile irritability. It is not hard to figure out which of the two groups made the most profit during the exercise.

Check your tone at the door

While it may seem like a no-brainer, how much do we really pay attention to our tone and body language during our interactions? We often take energy from a previous interaction into our next interaction and if the prior interaction was a negative one, we may be emitting some of that negative energy into the mix. Doug Smith recommended that one hack for this is thresholding. Whenever you pass through a threshold, focus on what is within that room.

The second example from The Happiness Advantage was the discussion about the importance of our words. “A few key words here and there can make all the difference,” Achor noted. “For instance, when researchers remind elderly people that cognition typically declines with age, they perform worse on memory tests than those who had no such reminder.” Achor also referenced the 1968 study Pygmalion in the Classroom where teachers were told that a group of “ordinary” students were the ones with the greatest potential for growth. At the end of the year, these students posted off-the-charts on tests of intellectual ability.

Our lives are greatly impacted by the stories that we believe to be true and many times these are stories that have been told to us by others. As I look at the post above and share the fact that every “we” is used to take away the vulnerability that would be present if it were replaced with an “I”, I think it is worth the time to make sure that my story is not fixed and that it is not inhibiting others to write beautiful ones for themselves.

Gratitude and the Flourishing Life

I felt gratitude this weekend for quality time with family.

In the last week, I had the good fortune of finishing The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor. At the same time, an opportunity arose to listen to Doug Smith, another expert on the topic of Positive Psychology. Smith, the author of Happiness: The Art of Living with Peace, Confidence and Joy, did a series of talks called The Flourishing Life last week. In the sessions, Smith emphasized the importance that gratitude plays in the lives of people who maintain a more positive mindset.

Smith had those in attendance do a quick exercise where he asked them to scan the room for everything that was the color blue. After about 30 seconds, he stopped us and asked us how many green things we saw. The point here was that we saw what we were looking for and it can be the same with our mindset if we are spending too much time citing all that is wrong with our lives and just seeing the negative behaviors of those around us.

“Gratitude blocks toxic emotions, such as envy, resentment, regret and depression, which can destroy our happiness.”

Robert Emmons

The best news is that we can improve our ability to show gratitude. Start a daily ritual of sharing one thing you are grateful for at dinner each night or start a daily gratitude journal. If you are a leader, think about ways to infuse opportunities into meetings so that people can share gratitude. If you are a teacher, look for regular opportunities for students to share gratitude.

For some research on the benefits of gratitude, check out this study from the University of California, Davis.

Perspective

At the end of last week, I was feeling a bit drained and negative when I was reminded of this TED Talk by Tim Ferris in his weekly Five-Bullet Friday post. Tim had this to say about Sam’s talk:

“This video hit me really hard. Despite some tears, it was exactly the reset I needed. This kid is a total stud. Just watch it, and do not rush. Also, do *not* read the description beforehand, only afterward.”

I agree 100-percent that if you are looking for a reset that you just need to watch this video and think about Sam’s three keys to a happy life.

  1. I am OK with what I can’t do because there is so much I can’t do.
  2. Surround myself with people I want to be with.
  3. Keep moving forward…If I am feeling bad then I let it in and then do what I need to do to move past it.

Why do we continue to overlook the power of sleep?

Matthew Walker’s new TED Talk, Sleep is your superpower (below), is another in a long line of research-backed publications highlighting the life-altering benefits of sufficient sleep. It still seems strange to me that it has taken so long for the points outlined by Walker and other sleep experts to become embraced and supported in a widespread manner. Instead it seems that we still highlight the grit of someone who can burn the candle at both ends and still seemingly function at a high level. We still poke fun at the person who goes to bed early and can’t keep up with the latest on Game of Thrones or whatever the latest must-watch primetime series might be.

The highlights of Walker’s TED Talk were outlined in a recent Wired article titled You’re Not Getting Enough Sleep—and It’s Killing You. While I recommend watching the video above and/or reading the entire article, here are a few takeaways from the article:

“The decimation of sleep throughout industrialized nations is having a catastrophic impact on our health, our wellness, even the safety and education of our children. It’s a silent sleep loss epidemic. It’s fast becoming one of the greatest challenges we face in the 21st century” 

“…all the ways in which sleep deprivation hurts people: it makes you dumber, more forgetful, unable to learn new things, more vulnerable to dementia, more likely to die of a heart attack, less able to fend off sickness with a strong immune system, more likely to get cancer, and it makes your body literally hurt more. Lack of sleep distorts your genes, and increases your risk of death generally…”

Don’t drink caffeine or alcohol. Go to bed at the same time every night and wake up at the same time every morning (even on the weekends). Sleep in a cool room.

New Week – New Start

This post originally appeared on the CrossFit 133 Blog

A new week provides a new opportunity to start on a course of constructive habits. Stringing together a few days gives us the opportunity to string together weeks… Stringing together weeks gives us the opportunity to string together months… Then you have a habit. There is no magic solution, recipe or guru that can do this for you. You just need to begin.

Pick an area to start a new habit this week

  • Get to the gym a certain number of days (schedule it now)
  • Get more sleep (7 hours or more)
  • Cut back on sugar 
  • Cut back on your social media time 
  • Show more gratitude
  • Spend more time on mobility
  • Drink more water

The choice is yours, so pick an area to work on and start making positive progress. The most important thing is that if you miss your goal then just begin again. Many people miss their mark and then allow the negative voice in their head to take control. Forget the negative self-talk and just start a new streak the next day. The truth is that you can clean the slate whenever you want. You are in control.

Have a great week!

Competence Precedes Confidence – Thoughts on Equity from the IDEAS Conference 2019

I was fortunate to attend the second annual Initiatives For Developing Equity and Achievement For Students (IDEAS) Conference at Bentley College on Saturday. The title of this year’s conference was New IDEAS for Developing an Equity Mindset. After the opening keynote by Zaretta Hammond, my notebook and my mind were full. Hammond, the author of Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain, gave those in attendance a great deal to think about.

While I could never do justice to Hammond’s Keynote, my biggest takeaway revolved around Hammond’s thoughts on the increased focus on social justice and equity in schools. She lamented the fact that conversations surrounding these topics have been going on for quite some time, yet the achievement gap for black students remains.

“Children leveling up needs to be the barometer,” Hammond noted. “All of the social justice talk we have been having and we still have the same data. Competence precedes confidence and social justice is focused on confidence when it should be focused on competence.”

While I could go on and share an endless number of inspirational words from Hammond, I want to dwell on the preceding quote in relation to myself. My own challenge is to become more competent in talking about matters of race from a position of knowledge and not settle for a sense of misguided confidence in the fact that having the best interest of all students in mind is sufficient.

“People are doing a lot of talk about equity, we need to have more doing.”

Zaretta Hammond

Letter From Celtics Coach to His 9-Year Old Daughter is a Must-Read

Brad Stevens recently wrote a letter to his nine-year old daughter titled Be A Great Teammate. As I read through the letter, I couldn’t help think that the qualities that Coach Stevens was encouraging his young daughter to adopt were also qualities should be adopted by anyone looking to be play a positive role within any group they interact with. In fact, he did point this out to his daughter in telling her the following:

“You’ll be on many teams throughout your life…The thoughts below apply to all of these scenarios.”

The other problem I had was trying to decide which part of this letter was the most significant. While I encourage people to take a minute to read the entire letter, the following lines from the concluding paragraph are the epitome of what I think of when reflecting on the great teammates I have had the good fortune of working with.

“When times are good, be the great teammate that others want to celebrate with. When times are tough, be the great teammate who offers a shoulder to be leaned on. When you get older, you’ll realize that it wasn’t about the good or bad times, it was about who you navigated those times with, the lessons that you learned and the relationships that you forged.”