A Few Takeaways from Inspired Learning 2020

I had the good fortune of attending the Inspired Learning 2020 Convention held at Nipmuc Regional High School yesterday and I wanted to share a few takeaways while the thoughts were still fresh in my mind.

First of all the keynote speaker, Matthew Dicks an elementary teacher from Connecticut, was tremendous. Matthew Matthew is a 45-time Moth StorySLAM champion and 6-time GrandSLAM champion whose stories have been featured on their nationally syndicated Moth Radio Hour and their weekly podcast. One of his stories has also appeared on PBS’s Stories From the Stage. His keynote focused on his experience as an elementary teacher and he encouraged the educators in the audience to “speak less and expect more.” He shared the following insights which I think are worth reflecting on:

  • “The moment I’m saying nothing in my class is the most productive”
  • “Find a way to have kids do something you think they could never do.”
  • “I sit in the back of the classroom and assign impossible tasks to children.”

If you’re interested, I encourage you to check out his TEDx Talk titled Speak Less, Expect More. Matthew also had a breakout session on storytelling and how to become a better storyteller and also help students with this. The TEDx Talk below is focused on both how to become a better storyteller and also how to slow down the pace of things in our fast-paced world. The best part is that it only takes five minutes…but will you do it?

The second session I attended focused on Media Literacy and it was led by Michelle Ciccone, a Technology Integration Specialist at Foxborough High School. Michelle shared some great resources on Media Literacy. This is definitely a topic that warrants greater focus in schools to ensure that these skills are embedded throughout the curriculum.

A few of the resources shared that would good starting points:

In any event, we are at a critical time in regards to helping students become more savvy at digging deeper and finding sources of information that are unbiased. In addition, I think it is important that the definition of literacy in the current day includes digital literacy and being able to understand where information comes from and what the intention of the provider might be. The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) had an updated position statement in November outlining its Definition of Literacy in a Digital Age.

It is worth a read and highlights the fact that this new set of literacies moves well beyond consumption and also encompasses creation, advocacy, the ability to build cross-cultural connections, and an awareness of bias and privilege. While I am sure it would overwhelm many, the framework is a valuable resource for schools serious about moving forward with this work.

The following statement from the introductory paragraph is spot on:

The world demands that a literate person possess and intentionally apply a wide range of skills, competencies, and dispositions. These literacies are interconnected, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with histories, narratives, life possibilities, and social trajectories of all individuals and groups.

Thanks to the great team at Nipmuc Regional High School for hosting this great day of learning!

One Comment

  1. Thanks very much for this, Patrick. Very inspiring. I checked out several of Matthew Dick’s TedX videos. Tremendous tales and fun too! I used to practice a version of his approach to doing nothing but with Adult ESL learners, so double challenge with language abilities/levels. Not sure if you’re aware of Seth Godin’s work as a Marketing guru in the best sense. I just signed up for The StoryTelling Workshop, led by Bernadette Jiwa, herself an incredible storyteller and workshop leader. See: https://thestoryskillsworkshop.com. Cheers, Graham

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